Padmashree College
The British College
ISMT College

7 Effective Ways to Remember What You Study

Article 29 Dec 2022 1355 0

Remember What You Study

How to Remember What You Study?

Remembering what you study is an essential skill for academic success. Unfortunately, it can be challenging to retain all of the information that you encounter in your classes and coursework. However, by following some simple strategies and techniques, you can improve your ability to remember what you study and achieve better grades.

One of the most effective ways to remember what you study is to take breaks. Taking breaks allows your brain to process the information that you have learned and can improve your ability to retain it. Taking breaks to stretch, walk around, or do some light exercises can be particularly helpful in this regard.

Another helpful strategy is to test yourself. Quizzing yourself or creating flashcards can help you retain information by forcing you to recall it from memory. This can be especially useful for memorizing facts or definitions.

Mnemonic devices can also be useful for remembering what you study. These are techniques that help you associate new information with something that you already know, making it easier to recall. For example, the acronym "ROY G. BIV" can help you remember the colors of the rainbow (red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, violet).

Teaching what you've learned to someone else can also be an effective way to remember what you study. By explaining the material to someone else, you are forced to think about it in a deeper way, which can improve your understanding and retention of the information.

Taking notes can also be beneficial for remembering what you study. By organizing the information in a written form, you can review it later and reinforce your understanding of the material.

Finally, reviewing the material regularly and practicing related skills can help you remember what you study. By revisiting the information and applying it in different contexts, you can better retain and understand it.

In conclusion, remember what you study requires a combination of strategies and techniques. By taking breaks, testing yourself, using mnemonic devices, teaching what you've learned to others, taking notes, reviewing the material, and practicing related skills, you can improve your ability to remember what you study and achieve better grades.

7 Effective Ways to Remember What You Study

There are several ways to help you remember what you study:

1. Take breaks:

Taking breaks can help you absorb and retain information better. Take breaks to stretch, walk around, or do some light exercises to help your brain process the information you've learned. Taking breaks can be an effective way to help you remember what you study. Here are some tips for taking breaks in a way that can help you retain the information you've learned:

  • Schedule breaks: Set a timer to remind yourself to take breaks at regular intervals. A good rule of thumb is to take a break for every 50-90 minutes of study time.
  • Get away from your study space: During breaks, try to get away from your desk or study area to give your brain a chance to relax and reset.
  • Do something active: Engaging in physical activity during breaks can help improve your focus and retention of information. Consider going for a walk, doing some light stretches, or playing a quick game.
  • Engage in a different activity: Doing something unrelated to your studies during breaks can help you relax and recharge. Consider listening to music, chatting with a friend, or doing a craft.
  • Avoid screens: It can be tempting to check your phone or watch TV during breaks, but these activities can actually be stimulating and may not allow your brain to fully relax. Consider finding an activity that doesn't involve screens.

By following these tips, you can take breaks that help you retain the information you've learned and improve your ability to remember what you study.

2. Test yourself:

Testing yourself is a powerful technique for remembering what you study. Here are some tips for effectively testing yourself:

  • Use flashcards: Create flashcards with a question or prompt on one side and the answer on the other. Quiz yourself by looking at the question side and trying to recall the answer from memory.
  • Create a quiz: Write out a quiz with a series of questions related to the material you've been studying. Take the quiz and grade yourself to see how well you remember the information.
  • Use practice exams: Many classes or subjects have practice exams available that can help you test your understanding and retention of the material.
  • Use the "cover and recall" method: Cover up the material you've been studying and try to recall as much as you can from memory. This can be particularly effective for studying facts or definitions.
  • Find a study partner: Working with a study partner can be a great way to test each other's knowledge and retention of the material. You can quiz each other or discuss the material to test your understanding.

3. Use mnemonic devices:

Mnemonic devices are techniques that help you remember information by associating it with something else. For example, you can use the acronym "ROY G. BIV" to remember the colors of the rainbow (red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, violet). Here are some tips for using mnemonic devices to remember what you study:

  • Acronyms: An acronym is a word made up of the first letters of a series of words. For example, the acronym "ROY G. BIV" can help you remember the colors of the rainbow (red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, violet).
  • Acrostics: An acrostic is a phrase in which the first letters of each word form a new word or phrase. For example, the acrostic "Every Good Boy Deserves Fudge" can help you remember the notes on the lines of a treble clef in music (E, G, B, D, F).
  • Rhymes: Creating a rhyme can help you associate new information with something familiar and make it easier to remember. For example, "i before e except after c" is a mnemonic device used to remember how to spell words with the letters "ie" or "ei."
  • Visual aids: Creating a visual aid, such as a mind map or diagram, can help you associate new information with a visual representation and make it easier to remember.

By using mnemonic devices, you can improve your ability to remember what you study. It's important to find a device that works well for you and the material you're trying to learn. Experiment with different techniques to see what works best for you.

4. Teach it to someone else:

Teaching what you've learned to someone else can help you better understand and remember the material. Teaching what you've learned to someone else can be an effective way to improve your understanding and retention of the material. Here are some tips for teaching what you've studied to someone else:

  • Find a willing learner: Look for someone who is interested in learning the material and is willing to listen to your explanations. This could be a classmate, a friend, or a family member.
  • Prepare ahead of time: Before you start teaching, make sure you have a good understanding of the material. Review the information and think about the best way to explain it to someone else.
  • Use examples: Using examples can help make the material more relatable and easier to understand. Try to come up with real-life examples or scenarios that illustrate the concepts you're explaining.
  • Use different methods of explanation: Different people learn in different ways, so try using a variety of methods to explain the material. This might include using visual aids, drawing diagrams, or using hands-on activities.
  • Encourage questions: Encourage your learner to ask questions and clarify any points that are unclear. This can help you better understand the material and reinforce your own understanding.

By teaching what you've learned to someone else, you are forced to think about the material in a deeper way and explain it in your own words. This can help you better understand and remember the material.

5. Take notes: 

Taking notes can help you organize the information you're learning and review it later. Taking notes can be an effective way to improve your ability to remember what you study. Here are some ways that taking notes can help:

  • Organizes information: Taking notes helps you organize the material you're learning and put it in a logical order. This can make it easier to understand and remember.
  • Increases focus: By actively writing down what you're learning, you are more likely to pay attention and stay focused on the material.
  • Encourages active learning: Taking notes requires you to process and synthesize the information you're learning, which can help you better understand and remember it.
  • Provides a review tool: Having written notes allows you to review the material later and reinforce your understanding.
  • Enhances memory: The act of writing can help improve your memory of the material. Research has shown that students who take handwritten notes tend to perform better on tests compared to those who type their notes or don't take notes at all.

It's important to note that taking effective notes requires a certain level of skill and practice. To get the most benefit from your notes, try to be selective in what you write down and focus on the main points. Use abbreviations and symbols to save time, and try to use your own words as much as possible.

6. Review and Practice:

Reviewing the material you've studied and practicing related skills can be an effective way to improve your retention and understanding of the material. Here are some tips for reviewing and practicing to remember what you study:

  • Schedule regular review sessions: Set aside specific times to review the material you've learned. This can be more effective than trying to cram all of your reviews into a single session.
  • Use different review techniques: Try using different techniques to review the material, such as rereading your notes, creating flashcards, or summarizing the information in your own words.
  • Practice-related skills: If you're studying a subject that involves practical skills, such as math or a foreign language, try to practice those skills as much as possible. This can help reinforce your understanding and improve your ability to apply the material.
  • Vary your review sessions: Mixing up your review sessions can help keep you engaged and prevent boredom. Consider reviewing the material in different locations or with different study partners to keep things interesting.

By regularly reviewing and practicing the material you've learned, you can improve your retention and understanding of the information. It's important to find a review routine that works best for you and to be consistent in your efforts.

7. Get Enough Sleep:

Getting enough sleep is essential for memory consolidation, which is the process by which your brain solidifies new memories and stores them for long-term retention. Lack of sleep can interfere with this process and make it harder to remember what you've learned. Here are some tips for getting enough sleep to help you remember what you study:

  • Establish a consistent sleep schedule: Try to go to bed and wake up at the same time every day, even on weekends. This can help regulate your body's natural sleep-wake cycle.
  • Create a relaxing bedtime routine: A relaxing bedtime routine can help you wind down and prepare for sleep. Consider reading a book, taking a warm bath, or doing some light stretching before bed.
  • Make your sleep environment comfortable: A comfortable sleep environment can help you sleep better. Consider using a comfortable mattress and pillows, keeping the room at a comfortable temperature, and reducing noise and light in the room.
  • Avoid screens before bed: The blue light emitted by screens can interfere with your body's production of melatonin, a hormone that helps you sleep. Try to avoid screens for at least an hour before bed.
  • Avoid caffeine and alcohol before bed: Caffeine and alcohol can both disrupt sleep, so try to avoid them close to bedtime.

By following these tips, you can improve your sleep quality and help your brain better consolidate new memories. This can in turn improve your ability to remember what you study.

Which time is best to study

The best time to study depends on a variety of factors, including your personal schedule, energy levels, and learning style. Here are a few general tips to consider when deciding when to study:

Find a time that works for you: Some people are morning people and find it easier to focus in the morning, while others are night owls and prefer to study later in the day. Experiment with different study times to find what works best for you.

Consider your energy levels: Your energy levels can fluctuate throughout the day, so it's a good idea to study when you feel most alert and focused.

Avoid distractions: Try to study in a quiet, distraction-free environment to help you concentrate and retain the material.

Take breaks: It's important to take breaks and allow your brain to rest and process the material you've learned. Consider scheduling regular breaks into your study schedule.

Ultimately, the most important thing is to find a study routine that works for you and helps you retain the material you're learning.

Why can't I remember anything I study?

There could be a variety of reasons why you might have difficulty remembering what you study. Some possible causes include:

  • Lack of focus: If you're not fully engaged in the material you're trying to learn, it can be harder to retain information.
  • Poor study habits: If you're not studying in a way that works best for you, it can be harder to remember what you've learned.
  • Distractions: If you're studying in a noisy or chaotic environment, or if you're trying to study while multitasking, it can be harder to concentrate and retain information.
  • Stress or anxiety: High levels of stress or anxiety can interfere with your ability to learn and remember new information.
  • Health issues: Certain health conditions, such as sleep deprivation or a nutrient deficiency, can affect your memory.
  • Poor retention strategies: If you're not using effective techniques to retain information, such as taking notes or testing yourself, you may have trouble remembering what you've learned.

If you're having difficulty remembering what you study, it's a good idea to try to identify the cause and address it. For example, you might try to find a quieter place to study or try using different study techniques to see what works best for you.

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